6 Ways for Mothers to Practice Deep Self Care

By Geordie Bull

When I became a mother I suddenly stopped jumping off bridges and climbing tall trees. My world became sleep times, healthy snacks and managing screen time. I planned for my children and eagerly awaited their births but I felt a loss as the wild aspects of myself that made me feel happy and excited to be alive fell by the wayside. While I loved my role as a mother, I also lost my sparkle.

In my heart I was still the woman who travelled the world alone and walked across Spain on the Camino de Santiago.

In my heart I was still the woman who travelled the world alone and walked across Spain on the Camino de Santiago. I kept my wild inclinations under wraps as I went about changing nappies and obsessing over sleep schedules. I thought that the adventurer in me died with the birth of my children because I could no longer board a plane to Europe or paint for hours. I also believed that I shouldn’t want for anything more than my children, as if yearning to write or paint made me a bad mother. My shameful secret was that I wished I could be both an earth mother and a woman of my own.

The suppression of my natural instincts in the quest to be a good mother came with a price – feelings of depression and anxiety. The birth of my second child was empowering and, in the quiet hours of a home-birth labour I glimpsed my animal nature shining through. I was amazed by the efficiency of my body and its knowing. But this feeling disappeared after the birth with the barrage of information on how to sleep train, breastfeed and discipline. I felt weighed down by my inability to get it all right.

Something nagged at me, the quiet whisper of my body, who knew there was a better way, a way I had never been shown. A question formed: ‘What would it look like to rewild motherhood? To move towards a more natural state of being as a woman and mother?

By listening to my wild whisperings I stopped chiding myself for not basing my decisions on the ‘shoulds’ of our culture and started leaning into my own deeply held values.

The answers that formed have since shaped the way I approach motherhood and the rest of my life. By listening to my wild whisperings I stopped chiding myself for not basing my decisions on the ‘shoulds’ of our culture and started leaning into my own deeply held values.

Here are some ways to nourish your soul through the early years with children:

Become part of a supportive women‘s circle. The experience of motherhood is so much richer when it is shared with other supportive women in an environment of honesty and integrity. Whenever I make the time to meet with other women I feel lighter, full of laughter and richness and creativity. You can join an already existing women’s circle, or create one of your own based on trust and integrity.

Awakening true feminine sexuality. As a busy mum, it’s so easy to let your libido go on an extended holiday. Reviving an authentic and personal sexuality can involve a bit of research and the willingness to dive deep to explore and unlearn our cultural conditioning. Women with a sexuality of their own exude a wild, natural energy, health and sense of wellbeing. It may be hard work to reclaim your lost sexuality in the early years with kids – but it’s worth it.

Women with a sexuality of their own exude a wild, natural energy, health and sense of wellbeing. It may be hard work to reclaim your lost sexuality in the early years with kids – but it’s worth it.

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